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Heat Protections for Florida Farmworkers (Program Repeat)
Florida governor Ron DeSantis signed a bill last month that would ban heat protections for workers. The federal government does not have laws protecting workers from extreme heat either.
Mexico: Voting Abroad
As tens of thousands of Mexicans living in the US have cast their ballot in Mexico’s presidential election, political observers explain the steps to vote.
Heat Protections for Florida Farmworkers
Florida governor Ron DeSantis signed a bill last month that would ban heat protections for workers. The federal government does not have laws protecting workers from extreme heat either.
Sustainable Fishing Communities
Marine life and fish populations are plummeting as a consequence of overfishing and destructive fishing practices. What are the biggest threats to our oceans and fisheries?
Plastics in the Oceans
On the heels of Earth Day, ocean conservation activists are participating this week in negotiations convened by the United Nations in Ottawa, Can, to agree on measures to curb plastic pollution, including in the oceans.
Colorado: Fighting Climate Change
On the heels of Earth Day, community activists in Colorado meet to explore the role Latinos can play in the fight against climate change. They discuss the disproportionate impact the pandemic had on Latino frontline, essential workers...
Targeting Funders of Fossil Fuel
On Earth Day, environmental leaders from the Amazon, the Gulf South, and other communities come together in New York City, holding Citigroup, the world's second-largest funder of coal, oil and gas, responsible for environmental racism.
Conservation Agriculture
Given the impact of climate change that affects the binational basin of the Colorado River, farmers in the Mexicali Valley reorient their work towards more sustainable and resilient agriculture.
Oceans in Danger
Due to overfishing, pollution and climate change, the world’s oceans are becoming a dead zone for fish and marine life and could be depleted of life in this century. According to the United Nations, 90 percent of big fish populations are depleted. What are the specific causes of mass fish kills? How to protect the precious oceans? How can citizens get involved? A recognized advocate also discusses the White House ocean justice plans.
Colorado’s New Climate Roadmap
Colorado’s Gov. Jared Polis launched a new greenhouse gas “roadmap” with the goal of reducing industry emissions and improving air quality. How green is the plan?
Mexico Edition: Disasters and Displacement
At least three million Mexicans are expected to be displaced and forced to migrate in the next three decades because of disaster emergencies such as floods and mega droughts exacerbated by climate change. What’s the outlook? How is Mexico preparing? These and other news are discussed with policy experts.
Petrochemical Pollution Ravages Community
As previously reported, human rights organizations revealed the devastating effects that toxic pollution from hundreds of industrial plants in Houston’s Ship Channel region, the largest petrochemical complex in the US, is having on the health of local communities. The watchdogs blamed local and state authorities for failing to enforce protective systems. In this program, journalists who visited a frontline community and interviewed Latino families share their findings.
Planada, One Year After the Floods, and More
Un año después de las inundaciones de Planada, el condado de Merced aprobó un fondo de 20 millones de dólares en ayudas estatales. ¿Cuál es el plan para distribuirlo entre los damnificados? Además, mientras nuevas tormentas azotan la zona, ¿qué se hace para evitar que el desastre se repita?
Extra Edition: Debunking Myths. (Program Repeat). Also, Toxic Oil Pollution Ravaging Communities.
Most Latino children in California live in the most contaminated areas and suffer from asthma and diabetes at higher rates than white children. In response, community advocates are launching a campaign to debunk lies and draw the links between these maladies and climate change and the role of Big Oil. They are also urging the government to adopt remedial policies. This archival program was originally aired on February 1, 2024.
Megadrought, Water Boards and Elections.
Latino voters show a growing interest over water issues, such as drought, inadequate water supplies and the Colorado River crisis, surveys say. Still, Latino elected officials are often absent in water policy forums and very few are represented in water agency boards. Too often, during elections, water board seats go under the radar screen of voters. How high of a priority is water supply in the agenda of Latino voters in the Colorado River basin? What’s the role of local and state water boards in ensuring equal and sustainable access to water? How do water board decisions impact the quality...
Colorado River: The Big Deal.
After the river water reached crisis shortage levels, and prompted by the federal government, California, Arizona and Nevada reached a short-term deal that would help reduce water usage and keep the Colorado River flowing. The breakthrough agreement protects the river and the water supplies for major Western cities as well as for major farmlands. What’s the impact of this agreement on farmers, cities, indigenous communities and Mexico? What happens after 2026? What are the long term plans? Can the Colorado River be saved?
Colorado Water Plan Falls short, Community Leaders Say
Despite extraordinary snowfall this winter in the mountains that feed the Colorado River, all indications suggest that the river basin will continue to dry up, exacerbated by the climate crisis. In response, the Colorado Water Conservation Board unanimously approved a comprehensive plan following a year of public discussions. However, some Latino and indigenous leaders feel that the plan fails to include the ancestral ways of life of the region's communities. Rossana Longo-Better brings us the details from Boulder, Colorado.
Trump Indicted. Supreme Court Curbs the Clean Water Act. Challenges that Cities Face.
Trump Indicted. Donald Trump is expected to surrender to authorities in Miami tomorrow after being indicted for mishandling classified documents and other criminal charges. First time a former president faces federal criminal charges. What’s the latest on the charges? Who is the judge? Who is the prosecutor?
Extra Edition: Rent Control, Air Pollution.
As rents in Fresno continue to climb, many young people and their families are facing instability and housing insecurity. Local community groups are putting pressure on the city government to work on rent control and tenant protections. They are also urging leaders to invest in new housing and address homelessness. On another topic, environmental advocates in the San Joaquin Valley sued air pollution control authorities to force them to remedy the worsening air quality after a recent study showed that this valley suffers the worst air pollution in the nation while industrial sources continue to increase air pollution.
Are Gas Stoves an Indoor Health Hazard?
Studies show that gas stoves generate toxins that can cause asthma, allergies, and other illnesses. Despite concerns and strong opposition from the natural gas industry, local governments in several states have banned or suggested not installing gas access in new building construction. The federal government is also taking alternative measures. Heidi de Marco, a housewife with health problems that she says are due to indoor pollution, tells her story from Bell Gardens, California.
Water Rights and Special Interests. Also, Saving and Managing Water.
California farm operators are still 90% White and this reality in California’s water rights system impacts the water flows of the SF Bay-Delta. According to watchdogs, these special interests are determining the Delta tunnel project and leaving tribes and communities of color out of the plan.
28th Anniversary of Línea Abierta.
Línea Abierta is the first and only national, live, Spanish-language call-in show in U.S. public broadcasting, and on February 25, it completed its 28th year. Radio Bilingüe launched Línea Abierta in 1995 to fill the void in public and commercial media of smart, thoughtful, Latino-oriented public affairs programming in Spanish. In this 28th Anniversary program, you will hear the prominent voices of experts who have lent their voices to our airwaves, but also, we will ask, “has a Línea Abierta topic or guest been impactful or relevant in your life?” As we leave the pandemic, what topics still keep you...
Extra Edition: California Storm Damage.
Communities around California are devastated after a three-week series of winter storms. President Biden visited the disaster area and vowed to help residents rebuild. This is a report on the recovery efforts.
Extra Edition: Flood Disaster Aid.
Heavy winter storms in December and January caused levees to break and rivers to overflow in the San Joaquin Valley and Pajaro Valley, flooding thousands of farm working homes. Those rural communities suffered tens of millions of dollars in damage. Are those families getting the emergency assistance they need to rebuild and recover?
Hazard Alerts for Pesticide Spraying.
As the state of California develops a system that will notify schools and people when a hazardous pesticide is sprayed in neighboring farms, two journalists set out to report on the dramatic human toll that pesticide exposure is having on farm working families. This report features the heart-rending story of a family ravaged by the effects of those chemicals, their activism to raise awareness about pesticide use and misuse, insights from scientists and practical advice to avoid pesticide poisoning.
Could Virtual Alerts Reduce Pesticide Hazards in California’s Fields?
Every year, California sprays millions of pounds of pesticides on its agricultural fields that are harmful to health. Farm workers and rural residents are the most exposed to the chemicals, and primarily Latinos and other ethnic groups. But next year the risks could be reduced when a system of virtual alerts is deployed before spraying. Such a system is the result of activism by affected individuals like farm worker Zaydee Sanchez, whose health was harmed by pesticide exposure. This research report on pesticides is part of the Palabra project and Environmental Health News.
California Native Americans and Farm Workers Unite on Water and Land
In the deserts of Southern California, an unprecedented alliance is forming to make better use of water in times of extreme drought. Organized farmworkers and Native American leaders are joining forces with a private nonprofit to serve communities deprived of clean water and find new ways to farm amid the threat of climate change. Maria Echaveste, head of the water management company Cadiz, says they are using new technology to harness the water that is being lost. The FIELD institute for farm workers will provide training on better soil and water management and alternative planting methods. Adonis Galarza is its...
Native Americans and Farmworkers Partner for New Farming.
Organized farm workers and Native American leaders are coming together in a cooperative partnership with a private water-management company to make water available for agriculture, housing, economic development and other uses for disadvantaged communities in an arid area where water is scarce. The historic project, geared to create the tools to adapt to the imminent threat of climate change, is set to benefit tribal and farmworker communities in California’s Coachella and Imperial Valleys and the Mojave desert. This is the first in a new radio series titled “Cuando se Seca el Arroyo…”
Protests Over Latino Activist’s Death at the Hands of Atlanta Police
The police killing of a young activist who was protesting the construction of a huge police training center in Atlanta has sparked violent demonstrations in the city. Authorities claim that the slain environmental activist, Manuel Esteban Páez, a Venezuelan immigrant fired a gun as police were clearing out the camp where they were protesting. His fellow activists are demanding an independent investigation. Gerardo Guzmán joins us with the details from Atlanta.
Exxon Predicted Global Warming. Are Gas Stoves Safe? Limits on Soot Pollution.
A recent study showed that ExxonMobil’s own climate research accurately predicted the pace and severity of global warming. Despite that information, the company chose to publicly cast doubt for decades on climate science findings, including UN-sponsored research. UN leaders say “big oil peddled the big lie” and called on political and business leaders to speed the transition away from fossil fuels.
House Refuses to Raise Debt Ceiling, Nation Faces a Crisis
This week, the United States reached its national debt ceiling, and if Congress fails to reach a deal, the economy could go into crisis. Congress usually authorizes raising the debt limit. But this time, Republicans who control the House are demanding deep cuts in government spending, including Social Security. José López Zamorano brings us the details from Washington.
Extra Edition: Flood Disaster Response.
In California, millions of people have been under evacuation orders or warnings due to heavy rains and widespread floods. A news contributor reports on the plight of the town of Planada and other Central Valley communities that have been under flood waters, and emergency officials advise on existing evacuation alerts and help available for clean up and recovery.
Severe Storms Cause Thousands to Evacuate in California
President Biden declared a state of emergency in California due to the onslaught of succesive winter storms. The state continues to suffer from torrential rains, overflowing rivers, towns under water, downed trees, massive power outages, and mudslides. So far, 19 deaths have been reported. Millions of inhabitants are still at risk of flooding and under evacuation warnings. Ruben Tapia reports on the weather disaster.
Chaos in Congress. Biden in Mexico. California Huge Storm.
Blocked by a fraction of far-right rebels, the Republican majority in the House has failed to elect the next speaker and without a leader, Congress can’t convene, vote on any rules or pass any legislation. What’s driving this Republican infight? What does this historic deadlock portend for the next two years?
One Year After the Devastating Colorado Fire, Why Have So Few Rebuilt their Homes?
A year ago, fierce winds unexpectedly unleashed the most destructive fire in Colorado's history. The fire started in the forest and quickly spread to the urban area, causing the evacuation of thousands, two deaths, the destruction of more than a thousand homes and structures, and multi-million dollar losses. A year after the disaster, only a handful of victims have managed to rebuild their homes. What obstacles are they facing? Rossana Longo-Better reports from Boulder, Colorado, the disaster zone.
Planning for the New Year.
As we look forward to the new year, news producers reflect on the issues that may shape Línea Abierta’s coverage in 2023. Plans include continuing covering the escalating climate disasters such as wildfires and heat waves, the West’s mega drought and its impact on the Colorado River and agriculture, overfishing and ocean justice communities, access to health care during the Covid-19 pandemic, the fight over abortion after the midterms, hate crimes and domestic terrorism, the border crisis and efforts to reduce barriers to naturalization, the kick off of the presidential primary season, and more.
Fusion Ignition: A Giant Step Towards Clean Energy.
US scientists produced for the first time in history a nuclear fusion reaction. Through this breakthrough experiment, scientists were able to reproduce the power of the sun, producing more energy that it took to start the reaction, opening the doors for a boundless source of clean energy, which could help end dependence on fossil fuels. What does this achievement mean for the climate crisis? When would it be available to consumers?
Extra Edition: Drought and Farmworker Migration. (A Program Repeat.)
California’s prolonged drought is forcing the San Joaquin Valley to put hundreds of thousands acres out of production, causing the loss of thousands of jobs. This worsening crisis, exacerbated by climate change, may lead to a drought-driven migration of Dust Bowl proportions. What’s the impact of the current drought on farm working families? Are they really leaving or thinking about leaving the valley in a mass farmworker flight? News reporters visited Huron, a community in West Fresno County surrounded by fallow agricultural lands, hit hard by the drought, and heard from farmworkers and city officials. Listeners call in and share...
Extra Edition: Universal Pre-School State. (A Repeat.)  Abortion Rights Supported by Voters. Climate Crisis and Loss of Species
New Mexico voted last week to make pre-K a universal right. A ballot measure will make New Mexico the first state in the country to guarantee a constitutional right to early childhood education. The measure gives lawmakers the green light to provide a dedicated funding stream for universal preschool and child care. An advocate explains this plan and discusses the road ahead for citizens. How to watch political decisions and hold elected representatives accountable after having cast their ballots?
Challenges of Cities and Neighborhoods.  Mixed-Status Families and Stimulus Checks.  Beware of Holiday Scams.
More than 3,000 local leaders from across the country recently met in Kansas City to discuss solutions to a wide range of issues facing cities, including public safety, homelessness and housing affordability, mental health, immigration, infrastructure investments, and the threat of the climate crisis.
Extra Edition: A Covid Winter Wave? (Program Repeat.)  Liver Cancer. Alarming Wildlife Decline.
The top leader of California’s health system joins this edition to warn people that as we head into the winter, the state should prepare for a spike in Covid cases because more people gather indoors. He advises about protective measures to prepare for holiday gatherings and travel. He also talks about who is at highest risk of long Covid and discusses the benefits of the new, updated booster shots.
UN Climate Summit.  Also, Future of Military Funds for Ukraine.
President Biden spoke at the UN summit on climate change, known as COP27, highlighting that his recent law providing historic spending on clean energy will “change the paradigm” and confirms the US commitment to reduce emissions and fight global warming. Also, the US Climate Envoy John Kerry announced a new and controversial carbon-credit plan to boost investments in low-income countries to help them transition from fossil fuel to clean energy. Environmentalists call this a “greenwashing” tactic.
Extra Edition. Drought and Farmworker Migration. A Program Repeat.
California’s prolonged drought is forcing the San Joaquin Valley to put hundreds of thousands acres out of production, causing the loss of thousands of jobs. This worsening crisis, exacerbated by climate change, may lead to a drought-driven migration of Dust Bowl proportions. What’s the impact of the current drought on farm working families? Are they really leaving or thinking about leaving the valley in a mass farmworker flight? News reporters visited Huron, a community in West Fresno County surrounded by fallow agricultural lands, hit hard by the drought, and heard from farmworkers and city officials. Listeners call in and share...
Extra Edition: A Covid Winter Wave? Liver Cancer. Alarming Wildlife Decline.
The top leader of California’s health system joins this edition to warn people that as we head into the winter, the state should prepare for a spike in Covid cases because more people gather indoors. He advises about protective measures to prepare for holiday gatherings and travel. He also talks about who is at highest risk of long Covid and discusses the benefits of the new, updated booster shots.
Extra Edition: Ag-Tech Jobs. Also, Wildfire Protections for Farmworkers.
The Biden administration will invest millions in California’s San Joaquin Valley to create an agriculture-technology hub and promote new, ag-tech and engineering-based jobs. But some worry these initiatives may not lead to better jobs for farmworkers.
Los Angeles: Recovering from a Political Quake.  Also, Rebuilding After Ian and Fiona.
Los Angeles: Recovering from a Political Quake. Los Angeles is mired in political scandal after the release of a tape containing racist slurs by Latino city leaders. What are the takeaways? How to rebuild trust between communities?
Extra Edition.  Also, Climate Agreement.
On the occasion of National Latino AIDS Awareness Day, public health officials give a report on the state of HIV among Latinos and the efforts to end the HIV epidemic. As Latino communities are among the most affected, public health leaders launch the campaign “Celebro mi Salud,” to promote prevention and encourage people with HIV to seek care, stay in care, and achieve viral suppression using HIV medication.
Extra Edition.
California began sending tax-refund checks to about 23 million state residents to help them cope with the rising cost of gas and inflation. Similar payments are being sent to taxpayers in other states. In other news, in the face of a megadrought, record heat waves and wildfires, Gov. Gavin Newsom and other West Coast governors signed a major climate agreement to invest more in electric vehicles, renewable energy and forest treatment. These and other news are reported and discussed in this edition.
Climate Change a Big Issue for Voters in November
The aftermath of the intense hurricane and wildfire season will be on the minds of voters during the midterm elections in November. Latino voters report that climate change became one of their top five issues of interest. What does this mean for the candidates' agenda in the regions most affected by recent climate disasters? José López Zamorano brings us the details from Washington.
Historic Devastation by Hurricane Ian in Florida
Hurricane Ian has passed through Florida, leaving in its wake a trail of destroyed homes, streets, powerlines, and trees. Large areas remained without power, Internet, water, and sewer services. Local governments and community groups are managing overcrowded shelters and beginning to count the number of dead and injured. President Biden called Ian the most devastating hurricane in the state's history and pledged all federal aid, after declaring the affected counties a disaster area. Rubén Tapia brings us this report.
New Heatwave Emergency Alert Law.  Also, US Blood Shortage.
As record-breaking heat waves exploded in California, Gov. Newsom signed a law to establish a first-in-the-nation heatwave ranking and warning system to protect communities that are most at risk to these deadly climate threats. The law would also improve access to insurance for climate-related threats. The top sponsor of the legislation explains the new law.
Extra Edition: Kidney Disease.  Also, California’s Climate Package.
A Program Repeat. On the national month of awareness of Polycystic Kidney Disease, a distinguished expert talks about the symptoms of this rare kidney disease. In the most common type, the kidney function worsens, eventually leading to kidney failure and possible dialysis or kidney transplant. Often patients are misdiagnosed and treatment delayed. A leading, Harvard-educated nephrologist talks about PKD and other common kidney diseases, including who is most at risk and how to prevent it.
Extra Edition: Kidney Disease.  Also, California’s Climate Package.
On the national month of awareness of Polycystic Kidney Disease, a distinguished expert talks about the symptoms of this rare kidney disease. In the most common type, the kidney function worsens, eventually leading to kidney failure and possible dialysis or kidney transplant. Often patients are misdiagnosed and treatment delayed. A leading, Harvard-educated nephrologist talks about PKD and other common kidney diseases, including who is most at risk and how to prevent it.
New Heat Wave Ranking Law. Oregon on High Alert for Wildfires. From Burning Hills to Polluted Water Supply.
As record-breaking heat waves exploded in California, Gov. Newsom signed a law to establish a first-in-the-nation heatwave ranking and warning system to protect communities that are most at risk to these deadly climate threats. The law would also improve access to insurance for climate-related threats. The top sponsor of the legislation explains the new law.
Children in Northern California Learn to Cope with ‘Toxic Stress’ from Wildfires
As California's wildfires become more frequent and intense, many children are experiencing stress, depression, and anxiety. To address this, officials plan to offer mental health services in shelters during emergencies. Heidi de Marco, a reporter for Kaiser Health News, spoke with two teenage sisters who went through this dramatic experience and brings their story from Sonoma, a city north of San Francisco.
Colorado Neighborhoods Tackle Climate Change with Solar Gardens
To reduce the risk of wildfires, the city of Boulder, Colorado, has built a solar garden for a mobile home park for low-income residents located near the forest. Meanwhile, the neighboring city of Denver is funding a pilot program of solar energy cooperatives in neighborhoods affected by pollution. Rossana Longo-Better reports from Boulder.
Emergency Response to Heat Wave. Also, Urban Heat Watch.
California is being hit by a record-breaking heat wave and dangerous wildfires. Los Angeles, a city with too much asphalt and too few trees, is the most vulnerable to extreme heat. What is Los Angeles’ recently appointed heat officer doing to respond to the deadly threat of the heat wave? What is she doing to help protect vulnerable populations from heat illness and death?